EYH Missoula

EYH Missoula



Date:
April 19, 2014

Time:
8:30 AM - 3:00 PM

Place:
University of Montana University Center Theater 32 Campus Drive Missoula, MT 59812

Phone number:
406-243-5304

About the conference

The Missoula Expanding Your Horizons Conference is a unique opportunity for girls in grades 6 through 8 to engage in hands-on workshops in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) led by female scientists, engineers, and technology specialists.

This event fosters middle school girls' enthusiasm for STEM careers, informs them of professions and opportunities, and encourages them to continue their studies in science and math to reach their goals and aspirations.

Thanks to everyone for making our first EYH Missoula (2014) a successful event!
Find out more about the National Expanding Your Horizons Organization by going to the National EYH Website and watch a video of girls enjoying an EYH event.



Conference location


University of Montana University Center Theater 32 Campus Drive Missoula, MT 59812


Sample student workshops

The Immune System & Disease: Players, Soldiers, Invaders and Destroyers

Do you know what an iron lung is? Do you know why we no longer have hospital wards full of them? Have you heard much about small pox or whooping cough? Be a part of the immune system army as we mobilize antibodies, T helper cells and T killer cells to fight disease.

Dr. Melinda Hutton, Director of R&D, Immunotherapeutics & Vaccines, and Rachel Ingram, GlaxoSmithKline

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Beauty and the Beetles

There are over 400,000 species of beetles - that is about 40% of ALL described insect species in the world! Come and see some of this diversity yourself in an entomology lab at UM. You will also learn how biologists at UM are using engineering tools to understand why beetles have such different shapes and sizes.

Erin McCullough, UM PhD Student, Organismal Biology and Ecology

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Can You Move Faster than a Dinosaur?

Paleontologists use dinosaur trackways to estimate speed. We will examine the physics behind this using our own tracks and compare them to dinosaur tracks. Come find out if you are faster than a dinosaur!

Kallie Moore, UM Paleontology Center Collections Manager
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Designing a Mission to Mars

Just what are the basic challenges of human space flight to Mars? We will use helium balloons to design, build, and test a prototype system.

Jennifer Fowler, Montana Space Grant Consortium
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Asthma and Pollen Counts

Ever wonder why your nose starts to itch in the spring? In this workshop you will tour the only pollen count station in the state of Montana and learn how pollen counts are created and what they mean for you.

Emily Weiler, UM Center for Environmental Health
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Good Air, Bad Air

Why is smoke from wild fires so harmful? How do you know if the air quality is bad? Or good? Exactly what is air quality?

Karen Wilson, Environmental Science Specials, MT DEQ
Sarah Coefield, Air Quality Specialist, Missoula City-County Health Department
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Time Title Leader
10:00 am Hands on Health Lisa Venuti, Pharmacy Clinical Laboratory Coordinator
10:00 am 3-D Printing Angela Lawrence, Materials Engineer
10:00 am Beauty and the Beetles Erin McCullough, UM PhD Student, Organismal Biology
10:00 am Amazing Brains Genevieve Lind, Graduate Student, UM Neuroscience
10:00 am Uniquely You: Identifying Individuals with Fingerprints Kaitlin Moe, Forensic Scientist
10:00 am Engineering for Stream Restoration Traci Sylte, Soil, Water, and Fisheries Program Manager, LNF
10:00 am Tools for Measuring the Earth Corryn Greenawalt, Missoula County Public Works Survey Office


Missoula EYH is strictly for girls in grades 6, 7, and 8!



Keynote speaker

Montana Hodges was born in California and named Montana by her parents for no particular reason. As a graduate of journalism and geology she is seriously committed to summer rockhounding trips. Today she is a graduate student at the University of Montana and works as a freelance writer, traveling between her home in California and wherever the rocks may take her.

She is the author of several books including:

Rockhounding Montana, 2nd: A Guide to 91 of Montana's Best Rockhounding Sites (Rockhounding Series)

Rockhounding Alaska: A Guide to 75 of the State's Best Rockhounding Sites (Rockhounding Series)